Friday, 3 May 2013

This Blog Will No Longer Be Updated


THIS BLOG WILL NOT BE UPDATED AGAIN! 

BUT WAIT!!! THERE'S MORE...

New Blog Launched!

I’m so pleased to announce, that after some minor technical & design issues, the over-hauled, redesigned, super-duper blog & website is now live atwww.rycariad.co.uk - it’s still being tweaked and developed but it’s all ready for public viewing! It’s been 12 years since I first started blogging - this is one of the biggest steps forward to date…
Here are just some of the things developed so far:
• Moved from Posterous to Tumblr
• Brand transferred for continuity
• Complete & dynamic site redesign 
• Disqus® integration for comments
• Full Twitter & Facebook integration
• Full RSS support 
• Links obtainable through post icon
• Simple but full search integration
• New contact page with…
• New social media widgets
• Mini bio
And here are some of the things being implemented in the coming weeks:
• New pages to be added soon
• Launch of Affiliates Programme
• Advertise on rycariad.co.uk
• Interactive gallery coming soon
• Interactive chat 
• and more (please suggest!)

I would be delighted to hear your feedback. I’d love to know what you think of the new design so far, and also would like to know what content you’d like to see more of.
Just visit www.rycariad.co.uk/contact with your suggestions…
Thanks and see you soon!
Ryan

Sunday, 21 April 2013

The Last Post

Just to remind you that this blog and all it's content will be deleted
permanently in less than 9 days. After Twitter acquired the host of my
blog, they decided to buy the competition and close it down. This
particular blog will not be accessible after 30th April 2013. So take
a look at what I've been posting over the past 10 or 12 years before
it disappears forever into the ether!

BUT!

The entire blog has now been fully migrated to a new provider along
with the vast majority of the content. On or before the 30th April
2013, the rycariad.co.uk address will be transferred to the new
provider. The content is already there, but I'm working on an all-new
design so what's there already is looking quite raw. If you'd like to
see it in its basic state, head over to
http://www.rycariad.tumblr.com/ before the new design is launched.

If you would like to be informed about when the new site is launched,
email me on rycariad@gmail.com with the words 'update me' in the
subject.

Thanks again to all my readers.

Goodbye!

Ryan

Monday, 25 March 2013

rycariad is moving home

rycariad.co.uk will be moving shortly. It's a headache for me but hopefully this won't affect any of my regular, loyal blog visitors.

Posterous has been hosting rycariad.co.uk since its launch in 2008, but I've been blogging for at least 12 years or more, sometimes under different names. But since Posterous recently announced recently that they had sold out to Twitter, tens of thousands of frustrated Posterous users who use their service to host their blogs have been scrabbling to save their data to migrate to a new host or provider.

I have decided on a new, hopefully more reliable host in Wordpress, and all the content that already exists on rycariad.co.uk will be migrated to Wordpress before the end of April 2013. This shouldn't be a problem for you and when I migrate the blog to Wordpress, you should still be able to find it by going to the usual site url and find everything on www.rycariad.co.uk. If you have problems with this after 30th April, let me know and use www.icariad.wordpress.com as a temporary workaround until I get the tech side sorted.

Thanks so much for following my blog, and for your continued loyalty and patience.

Ryan

To read the official statement from Posterous on their acquisition by Twitter, see this:

http://blog.posterous.com/thanks-from-posterous

In Flanders Field

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In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. 

~ John McCrae, 1915

Sunday, 24 February 2013

Insight: Humanity & Hillary Clinton - Gay Rights are Basic HUMAN Rights

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“Gay people are born into and belong to every society in the world. They are all ages, all races, all faiths. They are doctors and teachers, farmers and bankers, soldiers and athletes. And whether we know it, or whether we acknowledge it, they are our family, our friends, and our neighbours. Being gay is not a western invention. It is a human reality.”
 — Hillary Clinton

Human rights are inalienable and belong to every person, no matter who that person is or whom that person loves. Since January 2009, Secretary Clinton has championed a comprehensive human rights agenda that includes the protection of the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people.

But not being particularly politically minded, foreign policy speeches do not typically give me chills. Not so with the speech that Secretary Clinton gave in Geneva on the evening of December 6th. Her remarks made a powerful, timely and truly historic argument for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people across the world, not just in the USA, and her impassioned address struck me to the core. 

In its coverage, The New York Times led with the Obama administration’s declaration that it will be prioritising LGBT rights in its foreign policy. Clinton described the U.S. government as an ally to global LGBT communities and shared a plan for a Global Equality Fund totaling over $3 million.

But Clinton made a much broader statement, too.

As I listened to the speech, what struck me most was its emphasis on a shared humanity and the universality of human rights. At its heart, it was a fitting tribute to International Human Rights Day. By situating the human rights of LGBT people firmly in the realm of international human rights principles, the speech extended a historic call to action to individuals as well as international governments.

A few key points from her historic speech...

1. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights extends to ALL people, including LGBT people.

“Some have suggested that gay rights and human rights are separate and distinct; but, in fact, they are one and the same. Now, of course, 60 years ago, the governments that drafted and passed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights were not thinking about how it applied to the LGBT community. They also weren’t thinking about how it applied to indigenous people or children or people with disabilities or other marginalized groups. Yet in the past 60 years, we have come to recognize that members of these groups are entitled to the full measure of dignity and rights, because, like all people, they share a common humanity.”

2. Love and compassion are fundamental human values.

“Let us keep in mind that our commitments to protect the freedom of religion and to defend the dignity of LGBT people emanate from a common source. For many of us, religious belief and practice is a vital source of meaning and identity, and fundamental to who we are as people. And likewise, for most of us, the bonds of love and family that we forge are also vital sources of meaning and identity. And caring for others is an expression of what it means to be fully human. It is because the human experience is universal that human rights are universal and cut across all religions and cultures.”

3. LGBT activists cannot and should not carry the struggle alone.

“LGBT people must help lead this effort, as so many of you are. Their knowledge and experiences are invaluable and their courage inspirational. We know the names of brave LGBT activists who have literally given their lives for this cause, and there are many more whose names we will never know. But often those who are denied rights are least empowered to bring about the changes they seek. Acting alone, minorities can never achieve the majorities necessary for political change. So when any part of humanity is sidelined, the rest of us cannot sit on the sidelines.”

4. Both governments and citizens bear the responsibility to uphold and promote human rights.

“To the leaders of those countries where people are jailed, beaten, or executed for being gay, I ask you to consider this: Leadership, by definition, means being out in front of your people when it is called for. It means standing up for the dignity of all your citizens and persuading your people to do the same.”

“And to people of all nations, I say supporting human rights is your responsibility too. The lives of gay people are shaped not only by laws, but by the treatment they receive every day from their families, from their neighbours. Eleanor Roosevelt, who did so much to advance human rights worldwide, said that these rights begin in the small places close to home – the streets where people live, the schools they attend, the factories, farms, and offices where they work. These places are your domain. The actions you take, the ideals that you advocate, can determine whether human rights flourish where you are.”

Clinton’s charge has given the world the fire it needs to make human rights a reality for all.

0image

The video and written transcript to Clinton’s speech can be found here:


Insight: Humanity & Hillary Clinton - Gay Rights are Basic HUMAN Rights ((tags: Hillary Clinton, LGBT, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Equality, Equal Marriage, Equality, Diversity, Community, Inclusion, Dignity, Freedom, Liberation, Empowering, Huma

Image

“Gay people are born into and belong to every society in the world. They are all ages, all races, all faiths. They are doctors and teachers, farmers and bankers, soldiers and athletes. And whether we know it, or whether we acknowledge it, they are our family, our friends, and our neighbours. Being gay is not a western invention. It is a human reality.”
 — Hillary Clinton

Human rights are inalienable and belong to every person, no matter who that person is or whom that person loves. Since January 2009, Secretary Clinton has championed a comprehensive human rights agenda that includes the protection of the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people.

But not being particularly politically minded, foreign policy speeches do not typically give me chills. Not so with the speech that Secretary Clinton gave in Geneva on the evening of December 6th. Her remarks made a powerful, timely and truly historic argument for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people across the world, not just in the USA, and her impassioned address struck me to the core. 

In its coverage, The New York Times led with the Obama administration’s declaration that it will be prioritising LGBT rights in its foreign policy. Clinton described the U.S. government as an ally to global LGBT communities and shared a plan for a Global Equality Fund totaling over $3 million.

But Clinton made a much broader statement, too.

As I listened to the speech, what struck me most was its emphasis on a shared humanity and the universality of human rights. At its heart, it was a fitting tribute to International Human Rights Day. By situating the human rights of LGBT people firmly in the realm of international human rights principles, the speech extended a historic call to action to individuals as well as international governments.

A few key points from her historic speech...

1. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights extends to ALL people, including LGBT people.

“Some have suggested that gay rights and human rights are separate and distinct; but, in fact, they are one and the same. Now, of course, 60 years ago, the governments that drafted and passed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights were not thinking about how it applied to the LGBT community. They also weren’t thinking about how it applied to indigenous people or children or people with disabilities or other marginalized groups. Yet in the past 60 years, we have come to recognize that members of these groups are entitled to the full measure of dignity and rights, because, like all people, they share a common humanity.”

2. Love and compassion are fundamental human values.

“Let us keep in mind that our commitments to protect the freedom of religion and to defend the dignity of LGBT people emanate from a common source. For many of us, religious belief and practice is a vital source of meaning and identity, and fundamental to who we are as people. And likewise, for most of us, the bonds of love and family that we forge are also vital sources of meaning and identity. And caring for others is an expression of what it means to be fully human. It is because the human experience is universal that human rights are universal and cut across all religions and cultures.”

3. LGBT activists cannot and should not carry the struggle alone.

“LGBT people must help lead this effort, as so many of you are. Their knowledge and experiences are invaluable and their courage inspirational. We know the names of brave LGBT activists who have literally given their lives for this cause, and there are many more whose names we will never know. But often those who are denied rights are least empowered to bring about the changes they seek. Acting alone, minorities can never achieve the majorities necessary for political change. So when any part of humanity is sidelined, the rest of us cannot sit on the sidelines.”

4. Both governments and citizens bear the responsibility to uphold and promote human rights.

“To the leaders of those countries where people are jailed, beaten, or executed for being gay, I ask you to consider this: Leadership, by definition, means being out in front of your people when it is called for. It means standing up for the dignity of all your citizens and persuading your people to do the same.”

“And to people of all nations, I say supporting human rights is your responsibility too. The lives of gay people are shaped not only by laws, but by the treatment they receive every day from their families, from their neighbours. Eleanor Roosevelt, who did so much to advance human rights worldwide, said that these rights begin in the small places close to home – the streets where people live, the schools they attend, the factories, farms, and offices where they work. These places are your domain. The actions you take, the ideals that you advocate, can determine whether human rights flourish where you are.”

Clinton’s charge has given the world the fire it needs to make human rights a reality for all.

0image

The video and written transcript to Clinton’s speech can be found here:

Thursday, 21 February 2013