Sunday, 31 January 2010

Pontypool: Shut Up or Die

Saw this in HMV; made me laugh! A film about zombies called Pontypool. Could be so true... have you seen Ponypool* in the evening?! I shudder at the thought... like night of the living dead!

(Editors note: Ponypool is a town in South Wales, UK)

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Thursday, 28 January 2010

Goodbye to love

I'll say goodbye to love
No one ever cared if I should live or die
Time and time again the chance for love has passed me by

And all I know of love is how to live without it
I just can't seem to find it
So I've made my mind up
I must live my life alone
And though it's not the easy way
I guess I've always know

I'd say goodbye to love
There are no tomorrows for this heart of mine
Surely time will lose these bitter memories

And I'll find that there is someone to believe in
And to live for something I could live for

All the years of useless search
Have finally reached an end

Loneliness and empty days will be my only friend
From this day love is forgotten
I'll go on as best I can
What lies in the future is a mystery to us all
No one can predict the wheel of fortune as it falls
There may come a time when I will see that I've been wrong
But for now this is my song

And it's goodbye to love
I'll say goodbye to love

Posted via email from uselessdesires

A new era for Valleys radio

Gwent Gazette

A RADIO station is returning to our valleys in the form of Mountain FM.The new station presenters will broadcast from the original Valleys Radio Station at Festival Park, Ebbw Vale.

A new era for Valleys radio

A RADIO station is returning to our valleys in the form of Mountain FM.The new station presenters will broadcast from the original Valleys Radio Station at Festival Park, Ebbw Vale.

For the time being the broadcasts will only be available online.

The official launch of Mountain FM will take place at midday on Monday, February 1.

You can catch the launch and future broadcasts by logging onto www.mountainfm.co.uk.

The Rev John Curtis, who preaches at the Festival Church, is taking over the running of the station.

He is receiving help and support from his wife Dale, son Adrian and close friend and IT expert Johnny Jones.

The team are in talks with Ofcom to get their station on the airwaves.

“Research shows that only 40 per cent of people living in the valleys have access to broadband internet,” Rev Curtis said.

“In many senses it is quite frustrating to have these excellent studios and facilities and only be able to broadcast online.

“Saying that I am very confident that we will be able to get a licence from Ofcom.

“Even a community licence would be good news, we could start covering Ebbw Vale and then another valley such as Merthyr.”

The team behind Mountain FM, who have used the phrase “taking you higher” as their slogan, is determined to make their station a service for the valleys.

“We want to develop it slowly,” Rev Curtis said.

“We want to listen to what people want and design the studio around that.

“People were disappointed when Valleys Radio went and I have spoken to a lot of people who are very pleased at the news that we are operating from here.

“It is a very small operation at the moment but I am confident that when people log on they will find something worthwhile."

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Wednesday, 27 January 2010

BBC News - Apple unveils iPad tablet device

BBC NEWS
Apple chief Steve Jobs takes the wraps off its long-awaited touchscreen device, which the firm has called the iPad.

More here:

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Saturday, 23 January 2010

I Died A Death

I died a death but stayed alive
In phantom's likeness I survive
Alive, yet dead, I walk alone
In rooms with walls as cold as stone.

I lived a life and dreamed a dream
And loved the life you lived with me
Then in the whisper of a breath
You left, and then I died a death

Though dead I live, I cannot part
From love within my heart
Within my sorrow I must strive
To keep my hope and faith alive

For all the love that I would give
I surely would prefer to live
To be content, not to survive
But feel my spirit come alive

You slowly took your final breath
But it was me, my dear,
who died a death

© Ryan Price, 23rd January, 2010. All rights reserved.

Again, not big art, but random thoughts of old memories and special people.

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Wednesday, 20 January 2010

Monday, 18 January 2010

Gethin Jones Photoshoot

... so take off all your clothes...

Gethin Jones, former BBC Blue Peter presenter, and Strictly Come Dancing star...

... looses his shirt for a shoot with...

... Attitude Magazine.

To read the candid interview...

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Deeper Shades of Blue - Thoughts on Depression - A Poem

Deeper Shades of Blue

Dislocated,
Infiltrated,
lost without a clue,
Spilling from the edges,
Into deeper shades of blue,
Torn asunder,
Drifting under,
Hanging on for life.

Thrashing,
Smashing,
Wingtips crashing,
Warning signs are rife.

A vision in the distance,
Is it real or a distraction?
Following a dream,
Or just another reflex action?

Song and dance,
Clenched fists and rants,
Climbing up the walls,
Need a drink,
don't want to think,
What's lurking in those halls.

Gripe and shout,
Lashing out,
Pent-up fears,
Breaking down in tears.

Fall in a heap,
Trust in sleep,
The escape to peace,
Counting sheep,
no soul to keep,
Just waiting for release...

Ryan Price
(January 18th 2010)

It's not big art, just random, chaotic thoughts...

Posted via email from uselessdesires

ARTICLE REMOVED! BBC Weatherman Tomasz Schafernaker Attitude Magazine Interview & Photoscans

Sorry folks; due to potential copyright infringement, I've been asked to remove the Tomasz Schafernaker interview:

---

Begin forwarded message:

From: Matthew.Todd@attitude.co.uk
Date: 18 January 2010 09:53:45 GMT
To: ryan@uselessdesires.co.uk
Subject:

Hi Ryan

It's Matthew Todd here, the editor of Attitude.

Just wanted to say thanks for your piece on your blog about Tomasz. The blog looks great.

Have to ask you to take the scans down though, im afraid - you're more than welcome to keep the cover up, just we want people to buy the magazine to see the pictures and read the interview - otherwise we wouldn't be able to continue bringing you hot shoots like this!

Hope you understand.

Very best,

Matthew

Matthew Todd
Editor
Attitude Magazine

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Saturday, 16 January 2010

How to give more than 100%

What Makes 100%? What does it mean to give MORE than 100%? Ever wonder about those people who say they are giving more than 100%? We have all been to those meetings where someone wants you to give over 100%. How about achieving 103%? 

What makes up 100% in life?

Here's a little mathematical formula that might help you answer these questions:
If:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
is represented as:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26.

Then:

H-A-R-D-W-O-R-K
8+1+18+4+23+15+18+11 = 98%

and

K-N-O-W-L-E-D-G-E
11+14+15+23+12+5+4+7+5 = 96%

But,

A-T-T-I-T-U-D-E
1+20+20+9+20+21+4+5 = 100%

And,

B-U-L-L-S-H-I-T
2+21+12+12+19+8+9+20 = 103%

AND, look how far ass kissing will take you.

A-S-S-K-I-S-S-I-N-G
1+19+19+11+9+19+19+9+14+7 = 118%

So, one can conclude with mathematical certainty that while hard work and knowledge will get you close, and attitude will get you there, it's the Bullshit and ass kissing that will put you over the top

Posted via email from uselessdesires

BBC Weatherman Tomasz Schafernaker Attitude Magazine Interview & Photoscans

First off: I want to say welcome* to my new followers, I'm very honoured that you have come on board! Hope you continue to enjoy the blog.

I have Tomasz's full interview and accompanying photos for you below:













I'm glad that when he gets into trouble with producers, they are very forgiving! Rightly so, he's star... if he ever isn't forgiving, being slapped on the legs is the only punishment suitable.

I take my hat off to Tomasz though. I can walk briskly for 15 miles, doesn't bother me-- run for 15 yards it knackers me...

*Or should that be: "Witamy"? Or "wilkommen", "bienvenue", "velkommen", "croeso", "bienvenido", "welkom", failt", "Vítáme te" or "bem-vindos"

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Freddie, King of The Scratching Post ((tag, cats, iPhoneography, Leicester))

Friday, 15 January 2010

THE GLEE CLUB, BIRMINGHAM THE MIDLANDS' PREMIER COMEDY & MUSIC VENUE, featuring Kathryn Williams

Here's the initial line-up for the Glee Club in Birmingham, which features Kathryn Williams on tour, with the launch of her new album, "The Quickening" 

MON 18 JAN


FYFE DANGERFIELD (GUILLEMOTS) - last few tickets! 

+ VILLAGERS (Conor – solo set)
(Album - Fly Yellow Moon & Single - She Needs Me) "A revelatory solo debut album from the Guillemots main man. Dangerfield demonstrates an abundance of talent on a flowing, heartfelt collection that puts big, romantic songs at the core of his experimentalism." Telegraph 
GET A TASTER >www.myspace.com/fyfedangerfield
--
TUE 19 JAN
ANAIS MITCHELL + ERIN McKEOWN
(Righteous Babe Records - Ani Di Franco - double-headline show) "Fearlessly emotive... Like Dylan, Cohen, and Welch, Mitchell weaves her stories into an effortlessly beautiful and cohesive tapestry with the skill of an artisan's carpenter, showing no seams." – Acoustic Guitar "In several distinctive ways - voice, dynamic subtlety, and sheer songwriting ability - Erin McKeown is in a class of her own."- Sunday Times 
GET A TASTER >www.myspace.com/erinmckeownwww.myspace.com/anaismitchell
--
SUN 31 JAN
HAMEL (9-piece band) 
+ LEDDRA CHAPMAN (recent guest for Roachford) 
(See You Once Again - as heard on BBC iPlayer) Hamel's sound is unusual, a complex mixture of inspirations. One of his mentors was Jon Hendricks, American jazz legend, Hamel did workshops with him. He says "But at the same time I would like to listen to PJ Harvey, Jeff Buckley, Peggy Lee, who is very sexy and strict and melancholic, but I also like Prince and Carmen McRae." 
GET A TASTER >www.myspace.com/hamelmusic
--
SUN 07 FEB
JESCA HOOP
(toured with ELBOW & was TOM WAITS' nanny) (Album 'Hunting My Dress' out now on Last Laugh) "Like going swimming in a lake at night" TOM WAITS "By turns soulful & contemplative, spirited & witty, Hoop effortlessly shifts emotional gear, a striking ability to meld the traditional and the contemporary & her forceful, crystalline voice the constants" Time Out "Good enough to compare to the more wholesome elements of The White Album, Joanna Newsom's Ys and Elbow's quieter moments" (Guy Garvey sings on 'Murder of Birds') – The Guardian "So startlingly original, whose writing is so stamped with her personality and history. Hunting My Dress, confirms her as one of alternative folk-pop's most arresting recent arrivals, sings like an outcast angel and writes like a restless explorer" Culture – The Sunday Times 
GET A TASTER >www.myspace.com/jescahoop
--
THU 11 FEB
IAN KING BAND
(folk collaboration with Adrian Sherwodd & Little Axe)
--
WED 17 FEB
BETH JEANS HOUGHTON & STORNOWAY (TWISTED FOLK tour)
--
THU 18 FEB
6 DAY RIOT
(recently toured with Seth Lakeman)
--
FRI 19 FEB
ERLAND & THE CARNIVAL
(feat Simon Tong (The Verve) & recently supported THE LEISURE SOCIETY)
--
SUN 21 FEB
KATHRYN WILLIAMS
(new album - The Quickening)
ryan@kathrynwilliams.co.uk
--
MON 22 FEB
PETER GREEN & FRIENDS (FLEETWOOD MAC)
Seated show
--
TUE 02 MAR
TOM McRAE
(new album - The Alphabet Of Hurricanes)
--
THU 04 MAR
THE MISERABLE RICH & DAN WHITEHOUSE
"their lush orchestro-folk is heartbreakingly beautiful" NME
--
TUE 09 MAR
TURIN BRAKES
(new album due out on Cooking Vinyl records)
--
SUN 14 MAR
LUCY WAINWRIGHT ROCHE
(Rufus & Martha's sister)
--
THU 08 APR
JOHN SMITH
(recent support to Lou Rhodes & David Gray)
--
SUN 11 APR
Unknown Pleasures with
PETER HOOK (NEW ORDER) & compere for the evening – HOWARD MARKS 
The Hacienda: How Not To Run A Club - spoken word / multi media show
--
FRI 16 APR
TINY TIN LADY
"Absolutely marvellous" Robert Plant "A joy to hear" Fairport Convention
--
SUN 18 APR
ADRIAN EDMONDSON & THE BAD SHEPHERDS
Punk songs on folk intruments - genius
--
SUN 23 MAY
PO' GIRL
--
Check www.glee.co.uk for artist profiles, weblinks, downloads, videos - as much as we can find.

--
ALSO LOOK OUT FOR SHOWS FROM
--
GRANT LEE PHILLIPS, MELODY MELODICA & ME, KIRSTY ALMEIDA, MICK FLANNERY, KATE WALSH, EVAN DANDO (Lemonheads), ANGUS & JULIA STONE (20/4)

AND SOME OTHER SHOWS WE RECOMMEND FROM FRIENDS:
--
SUN 07 FEB
THE LOW ANTHEM - 02 ACADEMY
the glee show was stunning, as is their 'Oh My God, Charlie Darwin' album
--
WED 10 FEB
YASMIN LEVY - TOWN HALL
combines the purity of Ladino & fiery heart of flamenco
--
MON 19 APR
MELODY GARDOT - SYMPHONY HALL
who's last show in B'ham was Glee Studio!
--

Hope you can join us, Cheers!
Glee Music Team

THE GLEE CLUB
THE ARCADIAN
BIRMINGHAM
B5 4TD
----
BOOKINGS / FULL LIVE COMEDY & MUSIC LISTINGS / ENQUIRIES FROM0871 472 0400 OR WWW.GLEE.CO.UK
----
PLUS THE BEST IN LIVE COMEDY EVERY THU - FRI - SAT + SOME GREAT COMEDY TOUR SHOWS ON SALE NOW - seewww.glee.co.uk for full listings

Posted via email from uselessdesires

www.fotoflickr.co.uk domain-name for sale!

I'm selling my trading and domain name, www.fotoflickr.co.uk. If you are interested in buying the domain-name and/or the trading name of fotoflickr.co.uk , please email ryan@fotoflickr.co.uk to make an offer.

All offers must be received by 31st January, 2010. All offers will be seriously considered, regardless of the amount. The domain will be released to the highest offer and successful payment only.

Please just email me or contact me on Twitter @uselessdesires

Good luck!

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Wednesday, 13 January 2010

Reflections on the Death of an Animal-Companion

Some might think true grief is reserved for our fellow homo sapiens, but as a moving tribute from one British politician shows, the loss of a pet prompts real mourning.

Even in the UK, which has what is seen by many non-Britons as a slightly repressed attitude towards death, prolonged mourning and visible grief is considered normal for the death of a family member or a close friend.

But in a nation of animal lovers there are many who feel almost the same way about the loss of a pet, but whose emotions occasionally provoke raised eyebrows.

The writer, broadcaster and former Labour deputy leader Lord Hattersley wrote this week in a newspaper about his grief for Buster his canine companion of 15 years, who died in October. "I sat in the first floor room in which I work, watching my neighbours go about their lives, amazed and furious that they were behaving as if it was a normal day," wrote Hattersley. "Stop all the clocks. Buster was dead."

History is full of close relationships between man and beast. Read any history of Alexander and Bucephalus, his horse and constant companion, looms large. Much missed after his death at the Battle of the Hydaspes, a new city in what is now Pakistan was named after him. And what greater symbol of animal constancy can there be than Greyfriars Bobby, a terrier who supposedly spent 14 years faithfully attending his master's grave in Edinburgh.

ANIMALS IN AFTERLIFE

Some in ancient Egypt mummified cats and thought they had afterlife. Animal heaven frequently referred to in US and UK as 'Rainbow Bridge' comes from anonymous 1980s prose poem. It starts: 'When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together'

"For anybody who has had a pet in their life they form a unique and very special member of the family, and remain so," says Margot Clarke, manager of the Pet Bereavement Support Service. "In terms of that very special bond that individuals share it's like any bond, once it's broken, individuals feel that loss. That is expressed as grief."

Many of those who contact the PBSS are disappointed by the reaction of those around them to their loss. "They often trivialise that loss and don't recognise it as being special and unique," says Ms Clarke. "A lot of people say 'just get another pet'. But the time has to be right."

Established 16 years ago, the PBSS is a joint venture between the charity Blue Cross and the Society for Companion Animal Studies and provides what it terms "emotional support" - primarily by phone - rather than formal counselling for pet owners.

"A lot of our callers say to us 'Gosh I didn't feel this bad when I lost my father or mother or sister'," says Ms Clarke. It's a state of mind that Bob Nicholson can understand, having lost his dog Ivo, a Collie cross, after 16-and-a-half years. Mr Nicholson, of Fife, had raised Ivo from from a puppy to his death in September.

"I do not pretend that my grief was unique - I merely state, as a matter of fact, that nothing has ever caused me as much pain as Buster's death"
- Roy Hattersley

When Mr Nicholson, of Fife, had lost his father, the dog was there to help. When Ivo died, no-one was there. The dog had been a link to a father and a brother who had gone. Now that link was gone. "It's left a massive hole in my life. I lost my father two years ago. When my dad died the dog was there. I felt a bit ashamed - losing my dog actually affected me more than when I lost my father." The lack of understanding from some people is an aggravating factor. "Some people feel disdain [as] it was only a dog."

With the strength of these feelings, it is perhaps not surprising that many pet owners want to mark the death of their beloved animals. In Mr Nicholson's case he went to Dawn Murray, who runs the Pet Undertaker business from her home near Lanark. She organises cremations, removing the bodies from the owner's homes or vets' practices in a special animal hearse, taking them to dedicated pet crematoria and then returning the ashes to the owners. About 200 owners a year book cremations and there is the occasional burial as well.

"The dog or the cat isn't just part of the family it is their family. It may be they want their pet treated with the same dignity accorded to any member of the family. If granny died in hospital you wouldn't leave the doctor to make the funeral arrangements."

It is not just cats and dogs that are commended to her. She has dealt with everything from newts and lizards to degus, chinchilla-like rodents.

Many pets are regarded like family members: People also call her for reassurance and practical advice. Two issues loom large over pet bereavement - people not being taken seriously, and the need to take time out to mourn. "Most people they take the day off but most tend to tell a lie for fear of ridicule or that the boss won't understand," says Ms Murray. "They take a day off sick leave rather than admit to being off because of pet bereavement." Many of those facing up to such sadness want spiritual reassurance. When humans die, many religious relatives have the consolation of their belief in an afterlife.

In the world of pet bereavement, this is often referred to as "Rainbow Bridge", based on a prose poem written by an anonymous author in the 1980s. There are countless references to it on message boards and tribute sites. "Rainbow Bridge is a mythical pet heaven," says Ms Murray. "The spiritual side of pet bereavement is powerful. [Those that believe in it] come from all walks of life - they are not wacky people." Very loosely inspired by the Norse legend of Bifroest, the "rainbow bridge" represents the notion that owners will meet their pets again after death in a joyous reunion.

Cremations and even burials are wanted by some owners. It may be argued that it fills a gap left by the treatment of animals in some mainstream religions. "The churches have been slow to recognise the spiritual significance of the human-animal bond," says Rev Prof Andrew Linzey, an Anglican priest and director of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics.
"When a companion animal dies, we feel a natural sense of dislocation and loss. The churches should offer us rites to help us deal with our bereavement." Prof Linzey addressed this issue when he decided to bury his beloved dog Barney in the garden. As it seemed there were no prayers or liturgies specifically for the death of pets, he wrote the book Animal Rites.

And of course, there is something near unique about pet bereavement - the issue of euthanasia.

Many pet owners have had to make a decision that only tiny numbers ever have to make about a human relative - the decision to end a life, with all the guilt that that entails...

- Ryan Price (2010)

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Reflections on the Death of an Animal-Companion ))

Some might think true grief is reserved for our fellow homo sapiens, but as a moving tribute from one British politician shows, the loss of a pet prompts real mourning.

Even in the UK, which has what is seen by many non-Britons as a slightly repressed attitude towards death, prolonged mourning and visible grief is considered normal for the death of a family member or a close friend.

But in a nation of animal lovers there are many who feel almost the same way about the loss of a pet, but whose emotions occasionally provoke raised eyebrows.

The writer, broadcaster and former Labour deputy leader Lord Hattersley wrote this week in a newspaper about his grief for Buster his canine companion of 15 years, who died in October. "I sat in the first floor room in which I work, watching my neighbours go about their lives, amazed and furious that they were behaving as if it was a normal day," wrote Hattersley. "Stop all the clocks. Buster was dead."

History is full of close relationships between man and beast. Read any history of Alexander and Bucephalus, his horse and constant companion, looms large. Much missed after his death at the Battle of the Hydaspes, a new city in what is now Pakistan was named after him. And what greater symbol of animal constancy can there be than Greyfriars Bobby, a terrier who supposedly spent 14 years faithfully attending his master's grave in Edinburgh.

ANIMALS IN AFTERLIFE

Some in ancient Egypt mummified cats and thought they had afterlife. Animal heaven frequently referred to in US and UK as 'Rainbow Bridge' comes from anonymous 1980s prose poem. It starts: 'When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together'

"For anybody who has had a pet in their life they form a unique and very special member of the family, and remain so," says Margot Clarke, manager of the Pet Bereavement Support Service. "In terms of that very special bond that individuals share it's like any bond, once it's broken, individuals feel that loss. That is expressed as grief."

Many of those who contact the PBSS are disappointed by the reaction of those around them to their loss. "They often trivialise that loss and don't recognise it as being special and unique," says Ms Clarke. "A lot of people say 'just get another pet'. But the time has to be right."

Established 16 years ago, the PBSS is a joint venture between the charity Blue Cross and the Society for Companion Animal Studies and provides what it terms "emotional support" - primarily by phone - rather than formal counselling for pet owners.

"A lot of our callers say to us 'Gosh I didn't feel this bad when I lost my father or mother or sister'," says Ms Clarke. It's a state of mind that Bob Nicholson can understand, having lost his dog Ivo, a Collie cross, after 16-and-a-half years. Mr Nicholson, of Fife, had raised Ivo from from a puppy to his death in September.

"I do not pretend that my grief was unique - I merely state, as a matter of fact, that nothing has ever caused me as much pain as Buster's death"
- Roy Hattersley

When Mr Nicholson, of Fife, had lost his father, the dog was there to help. When Ivo died, no-one was there. The dog had been a link to a father and a brother who had gone. Now that link was gone. "It's left a massive hole in my life. I lost my father two years ago. When my dad died the dog was there. I felt a bit ashamed - losing my dog actually affected me more than when I lost my father." The lack of understanding from some people is an aggravating factor. "Some people feel disdain [as] it was only a dog."

With the strength of these feelings, it is perhaps not surprising that many pet owners want to mark the death of their beloved animals. In Mr Nicholson's case he went to Dawn Murray, who runs the Pet Undertaker business from her home near Lanark. She organises cremations, removing the bodies from the owner's homes or vets' practices in a special animal hearse, taking them to dedicated pet crematoria and then returning the ashes to the owners. About 200 owners a year book cremations and there is the occasional burial as well.

"The dog or the cat isn't just part of the family it is their family. It may be they want their pet treated with the same dignity accorded to any member of the family. If granny died in hospital you wouldn't leave the doctor to make the funeral arrangements."

It is not just cats and dogs that are commended to her. She has dealt with everything from newts and lizards to degus, chinchilla-like rodents.

Many pets are regarded like family members: People also call her for reassurance and practical advice. Two issues loom large over pet bereavement - people not being taken seriously, and the need to take time out to mourn. "Most people they take the day off but most tend to tell a lie for fear of ridicule or that the boss won't understand," says Ms Murray. "They take a day off sick leave rather than admit to being off because of pet bereavement." Many of those facing up to such sadness want spiritual reassurance. When humans die, many religious relatives have the consolation of their belief in an afterlife.

In the world of pet bereavement, this is often referred to as "Rainbow Bridge", based on a prose poem written by an anonymous author in the 1980s. There are countless references to it on message boards and tribute sites. "Rainbow Bridge is a mythical pet heaven," says Ms Murray. "The spiritual side of pet bereavement is powerful. [Those that believe in it] come from all walks of life - they are not wacky people." Very loosely inspired by the Norse legend of Bifroest, the "rainbow bridge" represents the notion that owners will meet their pets again after death in a joyous reunion.

Cremations and even burials are wanted by some owners. It may be argued that it fills a gap left by the treatment of animals in some mainstream religions. "The churches have been slow to recognise the spiritual significance of the human-animal bond," says Rev Prof Andrew Linzey, an Anglican priest and director of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics.
"When a companion animal dies, we feel a natural sense of dislocation and loss. The churches should offer us rites to help us deal with our bereavement." Prof Linzey addressed this issue when he decided to bury his beloved dog Barney in the garden. As it seemed there were no prayers or liturgies specifically for the death of pets, he wrote the book Animal Rites.

And of course, there is something near unique about pet bereavement - the issue of euthanasia.

Many pet owners have had to make a decision that only tiny numbers ever have to make about a human relative - the decision to end a life, with all the guilt that that entails...

Posted via email from uselessdesires

A treat for fans of Tomasz Schafernaker - in the Buff

Monday, 11 January 2010

Bubble's Best Bits

Some of comedy's best: I love Ab Fab's Bubble... and here's a compilation of her at her most ridiculous...

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Bubbles Best Bits - Absolutely Fabulous

Some of comedy's best: I love Ab Fab's Bubble... and here's a compilation of her at her most ridiculous...

Posted via email from uselessdesires

Saturday, 9 January 2010

She's Gone - The Cat Who Chose Her Home

On the 22nd October, maybe in 1994, something unusual happened on my birthday.

Outside the French-windows, on the other side of the glass stood a small black cat, no more than 8 months old. On the inside, a very cross dog barked. And barked. Despite the protests of the family dog (Lucy), the cat moved in and stayed with us for over 13 years. She chose us. Over time, Lucy and the cat became (almost) the best of friends. Jane, my mum, called her 'Bonnie' short for 'Ebony' but for some reason, the name didn't stick that well, and she was usually referred to as the cat. Maybe THE cat. This cat was the boss! Despite being head-strong, she was also one of the friendliest cats I had ever known, with a constant purr and such a placid 'oh if I must' personality.

Today, the cat said goodbye to this life, and headed home to the great tuna bowl in the sky... Goodbye Bonnie, the cat with no name. We'll miss you...

Posted via email from uselessdesires